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WINTER 2001 




M ■ 



Bryan Life M em ory an d H o nor g if t 



.2) 



Volume 28, Number 2 



M 

BRYAN 

c o i. [. l: c ii 
Editorial Office: 

P.O. Box 7000 

Dayton, Tennessee 37321-7000 

(423) 775-2041 

www.bryan.edu 

President 

William E. Brown 

Editor 

Tom Davis 

Associate Editors 

Brett Roes 

Lenita Sanders 

Director of 

Alumni Ministries 

Brett Roes, '88 

Bryan College 

Alumni Association 

President 

Steve Stewart, '85 

President-elect 

vacant 
Vice President 

vacant 

Past President 

Bud Schatz, '56 

Secretary 

Laura Kaufmann, '87 

Treasurer 

vacant 

Committee on Elections 

Kari Ballentine, '91 

Sharron Padgett, '87 



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Given By - Jane Fox 

In Memory Of- Her parents, John & Kathryn Schrey 

Given By - Mrs. Betty Klamm, Karri Astle, Lyla Klamm, 
Larry, Renae & Valerie Gates, Bob And Twila Uhler & 
Family, Lyle and Sue Klamm, Max Klamm, Jerry, Kristin 
& Jennifer Ramshaw, U. S. Trust, Elinor Klamm, West 
Enfield Baptist Church, Mrs. Jane Nash, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Ricker, Mrs. Jacklyn Clements, Steve, Pam, 
Fletcher Zanne, Craig, Louisa & Molly Hassenfelt, Mr. 
and Mrs. A. L. Peacock, Department of The Navy- 
Naval, Surface Warfare Center, Buck & Doris Paysour 

In Memory Of - Glenn Harvey Klamm 

Given By - Willine Reynolds, J. O. Albright Jr. 
In Memory Of - Ruby Long 

Given By - Mr. and Mrs. J. Larry Wooten, Jane Ellen 

Hodges, Miss Celia Dixon 
In Memory Of - Roger Davey 

Given By - Jo Alice Stultz 

In Memory Of - Rosalyn Gann Alexander 








Given By - T A. Freeman 
In Memory Of - Janet Webb 

Given By - Mrs. Beverly Michalski 
In Memory Of - Stanley Michalski 

Given By - Lock Thorn ison 
In Memory Of - Jim Irvine 

Given By - Mrs. Rebecca Van Meeveren 

In Memory Of - Lewis Warwick, Betty Wynsma 

Given By - Grace Miller 

In Memory Of - Calvin R. Miller 

Given By - Louis Myre 

In Memory Of - Billie Barrows 

Given By - Catherine Painter 
In Memory Of-D.\N. Ryther 



Given By -Mr. and Mrs. Gerald W. Kays, 
Mr. Charles Robinson, Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Carlson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Dale 

In Memory Of- Dr. T C. Mercer 

In Honor Of- Mrs. Alice Mercer 

Given By - Ms. Barbara E. Mcintosh 
In Memory Of- Richard Mcintosh 

Given By - Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Boeddeker 
In Memory Of- Linda Minter Peterson 

Given By - Mr. and Mrs. Mark Senter 
In Memory Of - Zelpha Russell Edewards 

Given By - Mr. and Mrs. David Ritter 
In Memory Of- Elizabeth Ritter 

Given By - Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Carlson 
In Memory Of- Mrs. Judson Rudd 

Given By - Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth G. Hanna, 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Senter, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Cathey 
In Memory Of -Mrs. Elinor Baker 

Given By - Mr. and Mrs. Gerry U. Stephens, 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lonas 
In Memory Of- Mr. Norman Skogsstad 

Given By - Mrs. Alice M. Mercer, Miss Celia Dixon, 
Miss Wanda J. Davey, Albert and Joyce Levengood, 
Miss Jane Ellen Hodges 

In Memory Of- Dr. Willard Henning 

Given By - Mrs. Frances P. Trotter 
In Memory Of- Fenmore Trotter 

Given By - Mrs. Tennga Conner 
In Memory Of- Lucy D. Sullivan 



Given By - Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Craig 
In Memory Of - Marian E. Hoffman 

Given By - Mr. John A. Wilcox, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas L. 
Harper, The Brand Banking Company, Frederick and 
Sandra Webb, Jan H. Overton, Mrs. Hope Calhoun, 
Billie R. Koch, Jim and Nancy Siler, Lige K. Sims, 
Susan Upshaw, Jenn Grigg 

In Memory Of- Harold P. Gann Sr. 

Given By - Thomas and Betsy Sullivan, Andrew and 
Nancy Boeddeker, Leonard and Kathy Gregory, Billy 
and Carol McFarland, Margaret and Patricia 
Straussner, Norma Schuchardt, Melvin and Blanche 
Smith, Marilyn R. Sullivan, Patrick and Deborah 
Dudley, Charlotte G. Dahlin, Sappington School Social 
Committee, Chancel Choir, Central Presbyterian 
Church, Clayton, MO, ART Happening 2001 Art Fair, 
St. Louis, MO, Mary Ann Harris, Carolyn, Watson, 
Dennis Martin, Dennis Ratermann, Susan Jeffery, 
Patricia Straussner, Robert and Susan Diesbach, 
Boyce Jr. and Nancy Norris, Rick and Debra Hamblin, 
Joni Hendricks, Patty Poltack, Cory O'Connell, Jackie 
Fox, Norman Jr. and Marilyn Behrend, Daniel C. 
Boeddeker, Timothy and Mary Driemeyer, Dorothy J. 
Gintz, Jeanne M. McCamish and Dolores K. 
Anselment, Sean and Lisa Quinn, M. Thelma Reiners, 
Robert and Donna Cerame, Vance and Michelle Ryder, 
Greater St. Louis Art Association, Inc., Thomas and 
Betsy Sullivan, James and Frances Cleary, Julie Tudor, 
Kansas City Office of Public Housing, Brenda H. 
Burton, Teddy J. and Brenda Crider 

In Memory Of - Clyde Boeddeker 

Given By - Kenneth and Carolyn Crider 
In Memory Of - Robert Jenkins 

Given By - Frances H. Price 

In Memory Of- Richard Mcintosh 

Given By - R. C. Alexander 

In Memory Of - Roselyn G. Alexander 

Given By - Orthopedic Associates 
In Honor Of- Dr. Tom Bovine 

Given By - Jack and Pat Cropp 

In Honor Of -J. Wayne Cropp & Family, James W. 

Cropp & Family, Connie Cropp Blair & Family, Linda 

Cropp Reynolds & Family 

Given By - William F. Campbell 

In Honor Of- Danny & Elizabeth Campbell, William, 

Paige & Hope Campbell, Greg & Chrissy Barkman, 

Zachary & Samuel Barkman 

Given By - Mary Lett 

In Honor Of - Sarah Martin 

Given By - Mr. and Mrs. Jean Pierre Pressau 
In Honor Of- Dr. and Mrs. Jack Traylor 

Given By -Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Jenkins 
In Honor Of- Miss Reva Jenkins 

Given By - Jim and Jeanette Morring 
In Honor Of - Ralph Toliver 

Given By - Mr. Nick Senter 

In Honor Of- Mr. and Mrs. Mark H. Senter, Jr., Mr. and 
Mrs. Noah Pitts, Jr. 

Given By - Alexian Village of Tennessee 
In Honor Of -Mr. Daniel Dorrill 

Given By - Joe and Velma DeWitt Foundation 
In Honor Of- Mrs. Velma C. MacGuire, Jr. 

Given By - Mr. and Mrs. Steven Prettyman 
In Honor Of -Mr. Fred & Dr. Mayme Bedford 

Given By - Mr. and Mrs. George Vogel 
In Honor Of- Elizabeth Jane Cornwell 



On the Cover - 
The events of Sept. 11 shocked the United States as perhaps nothing has done since Pearl Harbor. 
But destruction of the World Trade Center towers is not the only act of evil perpetrated in the past hun- 
dred years. Images shown represent individuals and groups affected by horrors of the past century. 



|eyo 11 d Blajphemy, 

Beyond Prayl 




Albert Camus' classic novel, The Plague, is a metaphor for 
our world of suffering. Published just after the Second World 
War, Camus' story describes the tragic city of Or an, quaran- 
tined from the rest of the world because of the bubonic 
plague. Once a city of excess and indulgence, Oran becomes 
defined by death and the residents struggle to respond to their 
suffering. The narrator, Dr. Bernard Riuex, takes a scientific 
and detached view of the horrors surrounding him. He 
acknowledges, however, that the reality of suffering draws 
people together. Regardless of religious beliefs or personal 
convictions, suffering is "beyond blasphemy, beyond prayer" 
in the way it unites people to weep, to work and to fight 
against terror. 

Every worldview and religion is forced to deal with the 
issue of suffering. It cuts to the heart of our fragile existence. 
When we see news reports of a destructive hurricane in India 
and a famine in Kenya, we all weep. The agonized faces of 
children grip the heart of every parent. The helplessness of the 
injured and grieving motivate us to give, pray and work. We 
don't ask questions about political beliefs, religious affiliation 
or ethnic background. We are bound together by a bond 
stronger than social agendas. It is the bond of humanity and 
the suffering that marks us as a fallen people. 

Suffering unites us all. It is the one experience that pulls at 
the soul of every person and dynamites the walls that divide 
us. We all meet and cry together at the smoldering ruins, the 
hospital, the funeral home. Since September 11, the unity we 
as a nation experience defies analysis. For some it is the result 
of facing a single enemy, for others it is the force of a common 



£3) 

■ "■ 



The Problem of Evil 



from Making Sense of Your World, 

by W. Gary Phillips and William E. Brown 



The problem of evil is the shadow that falls across the biblical teach- 
ing about God's character. Why does an all-good and all-powerful God 
allow evil in His creation. How do we reconcile the pain in the world, 
and the pain in our own lives, with the character of the God we see in 
the Bible? 

By "evil" we mean both moral evil and natural evil. The term moral 
evil refers to the evil choices made by free human agents. Natural evil 
does not involve human willing or acting, nor does it necessarily reflect 
any observable, intelligent purpose. 

A View of the Future: The Factor of Time 



This is logically coherent and is precisely what the Bible claims. 
Although we do not yet have enough data to answer why each individ- 
ual act of suffering takes place, we have a reasonable perspective within 
which to deal with our pain. Is our biblical worldview large enough to 



ose who belong to Jesus have been told to anticipate 
their Lord in suffering (John 15:20-27; Rom. 8:17), rec 
Las overcome the world (John 16:33). Therefore, we Cc 



is present time 



at is to be revealed in us" (Rom 
the ultimate apologetic for the 



The component of time is crucial to a biblical worldview of evil 
(Rom. 8:18). One day, God will wipe away all tears from our eyes (Rev. 
21:4). Until then, even saints in the Lord's presence wail "How long O 
Lord?" as they anticipate cosmic restoration (Rev. 6:10). 

Let us reconsider our original propositions: 



If God were all-powerful, He could destroy evi 
If God were all-good, He would destroy evil. 



fort in the fact "that the sufferings of this presen 
be compared with the glory that is to be reveale 
From a biblical worldview, the ultimate apo] 
evil is God's action (through Christ) in becomin 
the victim of maximum evil. God took the pun- 
ishment of sin upon Himself. He became man, 
and in that form He — and He alone — suffered 
the entire composite of human evil and misery. 
Not only did He bear our sins, he bore our emo- 
tional pain (Isa. 53:4). 



r ■ rri ivr "H n-Ml 



Before drawing the conclusion, the last proposition should be 
reworded to fit with our biblical worldview. This is how it should read: 
Evil has not yet been destroyed. Thus we may draw a new conclusion: 
Evil will be destroyed by an all-good, all-powerful God. 






wiw 



We ai a nation 

turned to God 

in prayer after 

the attacfy." 




goal. But for most, it is the grief of suffering that has no name. 

We can ask why God did not keep it from occurring. We can ask the 
same question about the millions slaughtered in the name of atheism by 
Stalin, Hitler, Pol Pot, Idi Amin. We can ask why He allowed Dylan 
Klebold and Eric Harris to rampage through Columbine High School. 

But the answers are not apparent. 

Many nonbelievers arrogantly point to the existence of suffering in 
the world as the once-and-for-all proof that a good God cannot exist. 
And if a good God cannot exist then there is, in fact, no God at all. The 
existence of evil, writes philosopher Ed Miller, "is the most notorious 
evidence against God." 

But I do not want to discuss the existence of God in light of evil in 
our world. We have written about this elsewhere (see the excerpt from 
Making Sense of Your World in this issue of Bryan Life). C. S. Lewis 
devotes some of his sharpest reasoning in his classic work, The Problem 
of Pain, where he reminds us that our response to suffering reveals our 
understanding of God. "The problem of reconciling human suffering 
with the existence of God who loves," he writes, "is only insoluble so 
long as we attach a trivial meaning to the word 'love/ and limit His wis- 
dom by what seems to us to be wise." 

We may not know the reasons God allows suffering in particular 
instances. God's ways are sometimes beyond knowing on this side of 
the resurrection. 

But one day we will know. Until then, suffering is a foil - a means to 
saltiness in an unsavory world. 

Suffering provides a level playing field for ideas. 

The unity we enjoyed in the months after the terrorist attacks provid- 
ed us with the opportunity to look each other in the eye - even ideologi- 
cal adversaries - and relate at the most basic levels of humanity. While 
discussions about ultimate questions, political issues or social policies 
usually generate more heat than light, the attacks changed that. We want 
substance, not sound bites. 

Studies and polls showed that people became less interested in frivo- 
lous activities and more serious about family and relationships. People 
went to church and prayed more. Incidents of bigotry and racism 
dropped dramatically. People were actually nicer to each other! Why? 
Because we recognize that what unites us is stronger than what divides 
us. Suffering makes us aware of a truth that we all try to suppress: we 
are not in control of our lives. 

Suffering shows that there is something wrong with the world. 

When we feel a pain in our body, it is a symptom that something is 
wrong. We never go the doctor and say, "Hey, Doc, I've been feeling 
really great lately. Can you run some tests and find out why?" The pain 
and suffering in the world is a constant reminder that something is hor- 
ribly wrong with creation. To know that something is wrong is to imply 
that we know what it means to be right. 



Li 





The opportunity to communicate to a suffering 
world how God can make it right is the Christian's 
privilege. We give an answer for the hope that is 
within us (1 Peter 3:15). 

Suffering is only engaged and conquered by the 
One who suffered with us and for us. 

The suffering of Christ is not merely intended 
to show God's empathy for a fallen world. He took 
upon Himself the very consequences of the sin 
that spoiled His creation. Christ suffered "once for 
all" (Hebrews 9:12) and because of His sufferings 
all pain takes on a new meaning as temporary irri- 
tant, not ultimate victor. Even death itself will be 
the last enemy destroyed (1 Corinthians 15:25-26). 
We are never victims and we will never allow suf- 
fering, no matter how evil and destructive, to 
drive us to despair. 

Suffering is the means God uses to communicate to 
us in His most passionate way. 



Many claim that suffering drives people away 
from God. It is an odd quirk of human nature that 
most often the opposite occurs. We as a nation 
turned to God in prayer after the attacks. Not out 
of fear or weakness but out of knowledge and 
strength. Pain is, as C. S. Lewis reminds us, 
"God's megaphone." 

For many people, suffering is the road 
traveled to find God and meaning. 
Viktor Frankl, thrust into the ugly hope- 
lessness and horror of the Nazi death 
camps, not only survived but grew 
through his experience. He described 
working in a trench outside of 
Auschwitz, "struggling to find a 
reason for my sufferings, my slow 
dying. In a last violent protest 
against the hopelessness of 
imminent death, I sensed in 
my spirit piercing 
through the envelop- 
ing gloom. I felt it 






transcend that hopelessness, meaningless world, 
and from somewhere I heard a victorious 'Yes' in 
answer to my question of the existence of an ulti- 
mate purpose. At that moment a light was lit in a 
distant farmhouse, which stood on the horizon as 
if painted there, in the midst of the miserable gray 
of a dawning morning in Bavaria. Et lux in tenebris 
lucet - and the light shineth in the darkness." 

A meaningful and happy life is not always free 
from suffering. In fact, suffering is often the means 
to a life of joy and significance. 

But this does not take away the real horror of 
suffering. We cannot give a definitive answer to 
those who ask why God allowed the horrible acts 
to occur. The answer is not found in a pronounce- 
ment or a philosophy. 

It is found in a Person. 

"Is God trying to tells us something?" writes 
Philip Yancey. "From the view of all history, yes, 
God is speaking to us through pain - or, perhaps, 
in spite of pain. The symphony He is working out 
includes minor chords, dissonance and tiring fugal 
passages. But those of us who follow His conduct- 
ing through these early movements will, with 
renewed strength, someday burst into song." lil 




eI^ 


1 

i 


^Ufc 


lj 1 am 




The pictures of 
New York City 
were taken by 
alumnus Walt 
Jackson, '82. Walt 
walked through 
the World Trade 
Center complex 
just minutes 

plane hit 



!»"/• 



■ _ 


fl 

w 

■ 



n 



r 



a 





where does God fit in? 




By Serge Yurovsky, Class of '98 




Living in New York, you take certain things for 
granted. You assume it will be standing-room- 
only in the subway this afternoon, that a good 
bagel is just around a corner and that your next 
cab driver probably knows the city worse than you 
do. You are also used to looking at the skyline and 
seeing two tall steel giants holding up the skies 
over this busy city. 

At least we used to. 

As I sit in the subway crossing the Manhattan 
Bridge, the sight still causes me to pause. The twin 
giants are gone and so are the hopes and dreams of 
over 4,000 people and their families. New Yorkers 
are asking big questions now: "Where was God on 
Sept. 11?" and more importantly 'Where is He 
now?" 

I can tell you with full certainty - God is here 
now! He is in this city, His presence stronger than 
ever, His Word armed with the power to heal and 
rebuild both the lives of the people and the heart 
of the city. 

God is in the little things, like the hundreds of 
calls and e-mails that many New Yorkers and I 
have received from friends all over the world. You 
can feel God's presence on the streets when you 
see just a bit more kindness than is normal in the 
city. These days someone may share a cab with 
you, give up a seat on the subway or even not be 
quick to anger when you bump in to them on the 
street. 

God is also in the bigger things. His word rings 
on many street corners from Union to Times 
Square. Churches are fuller now than anytime in 
the recent past. People are seeking answers and 



peace. While everyone from Hare Krishna to 
Jehovah's Witnesses are trying to convince people 
that they have the truth, I believe God's truth and 
His Word are prevailing. 

The church where I worship is in Greenwich 
Village, half a block from St. Vincent's hospital, the 
medical facility where the majority of WTC victims 
were taken on 9/11. Walls of the hospital are cov- 
ered with pictures and posters of loved ones lost. 
There I have encountered much grief, anger and 
despair. Still, those people are looking for some- 
thing to hang on to. 

My church and many others have opened their 
doors and hearts to the city. Thanks to the prayers 
and support of believers from around the world, 
they are able to provide emotional, physical and 
financial support to those who need it. More 
important, this tragedy has opened the broken 
hearts of this city to the Gospel. 

As I walk near Ground Zero, the sight is terrify- 
ing and the smell of death and destruction lingers. 
Still, I believe this is a great time for New York. We 
cannot afford to let this amazing opportunity slip 
away. Please point your hearts to this city, this 
place that is in a desperate need of God. Don't let 
the vigor of your prayers fade away as the dust 
settles, the smoke clears and our lives get back to 
the daily busyness. 

This city will rebuild. The big question is "How 
much will it embrace God and His love to allow all 
of us to rebuild our hearts?" 

(Editor's note: Serge Yurovsky may be contacted at 50 Noel Ave., 
Brooklyn, NY 11229 or by e-mail at serge@theleftlane.com.) 



Editor's Note: The following was written by 

an alumni couple who have lived in 

Pakistan for some 20 years. For their safety 

and to protect their work, they asked that 

their names not be used. 



defend Islam, 

are attracted by grace 



People of the east, including Muslims, are very friendly and hos- 
pitable. We were always amazed at the amount of food provided for 
what was to be a simple meal. At times when I was alone at home a 
Muslim friend would urge me to stay with him and enjoy the compa- 
ny of another human being. 

But we found that when talking about Jesus or the Bible, Muslims 
were quick to tell us our errors while defending Islam as the perfect 
religion. 

There are good Muslims and bad Muslims, just as there are good 
Christians and bad Christians. As I see it, God gave His law to His 
people who were not able to live by that law in a way that pleased 
God. God then revealed grace through Jesus Christ. About 600 years 
later in reverse of this grace the prophet of Islam came bringing back 
the law of God. "These are the requirements of Allah. Do this and you 
will please him." 

What is done outwardly in Islam seems very important. The pious 
Muslim can make me feel irreligious as he does his formal public 
prayers five time a day, as he fasts for one month during the year, 
gives alms to the poor, etc. In contrast, I've never had a Muslim offer 
to pray with me or for me. Islamic religious leaders interpret right and 
wrong, define the "law," and lead in the acts of devotion, but are not 
"priests" who mediate between God and man. Interestingly, every fol- 
lower of Christ is a priest who can pray with Muslim friends. I have 
never had a Muslim refuse prayer. In fact, they come to expect it. 

A Muslim cannot be neutral toward the enemies of Islam. Muslims 
believe that Islam is the perfect religion and if followed completely the 
perfect government, economic and social systems will follow. They 
believe the current disarray in Muslim countries cannot be blamed on 
the religion of Islam, but it can be blamed on the Christian West, 
which is forcing its values on the Muslim world. Therefore, certain 
Muslims have decided to fight against the West to break its grip on 
their society. To fight for Islam may be the greatest work possible for 
pleasing Allah. To be martyred in such a fight is to gain instant access 
to paradise. 

Christians have something else to offer. Recently, a Muslim wrote me 
saying that it is impossible and ridiculous to love your enemies. "Such a 
statement is proof of the inadequacy of the Bible showing that it has 
been superseded by the Q'uran and that Islam is superior." 

In a tourist area a Pakistani boy was throwing stones at a foreign 
child. The Pakistani family grabbed the boy, apologizing profusely. 

The foreign family said, "We can forgive, because our God has 
taught us to love even our enemies." Hearing this, a young Muslim 
man started his journey toward this God of love who teaches us to 
love our enemies, fill 



E S PORTS PAGE 



n 





Members of the Lions 
basketball team include, 
from left, front, Aur +: ~ 
McElroy, Dillon Mc_..v, y , 
Chris Travis, co-captain Brett 
Wright, Head Coach Morris 
Michalski, co-captain Jared 
Jones, Aaron Braun-Duin, 
Michael Carter and Josh 
Brown. Back are Athletic 
Trainer Mike Weller, student 
Coach David Arute, Coach 
Terry Hill, Jordan 
Musselman, Jeff Rohman, 
Brandon Gordon, Michael 
Stone, Josh Locy, Gene 
Henley, Blake Bohler and 
managers David Chambers, 
Shannon Reynolds and 
Candi Caudill. 



LIONS * 

SHALL 



HEI'S 
FUST 



AS K ETI ALL: 

YOUNG.. . 



Lions Basketball schedule 



11/3 Mid-Continent College Home 

11/8 Bluefield College* H 

11/9-10 Atlanta Christian Tipoff Tourney Away 

11/13 Covenant* A 

11/7 Middle Tenn. State A 

11/19 Lee A 

11/24 Pensacola Christian A 

11/27 Tennessee Temple H 

12/1 Alice Lloyd* A 

12/4 Lee H 

12/8 Milligan* A 

12/13 Tennessee Temple A 

1/3 Pensacola Christian H 

1/5 Crighton A 

1/8 Virginia Intermont* H 

1/11 Bluefield* A 

1/2 Univ. Virginia-Wise* A 

1/15 Brevard* H 

1/17 King* H 

1/19 Alice Lloyd* H 

1/22 Covenant* H 

1/26 Milligan* H 

1/29 Tennessee Wesleyan* A 

2/1 Brevard* A 

2/2 Montreat* A 

2/5 Tennessee Wesleyan* H 

2/9 Virginia Intermont* A 

2/12 King* A 

2/15 Montreat* H 

2/16 Univ. Virginia-Wise* H 

2/20-23 AAC Conference Tourney Bristol, TN 

3/1 -2 NCCAA Mideast Region Tourney 

3/6-12 NAIA National Tourney Branson, MO | 

*denotes AAC Conference game 
Bold denotes home game 



I, H n * ii |, 

"We're really, really young," Coach Morris Michalski said 
of the 2001-2002 Lions basketball squad. "We have 16 on the 
team and only five of them are back from last year. Of those 
five, only one was a consistent starter last year, and for three of 
the five, last year was their first year playing varsity ball. 
Replacing over 65 points per game in offense will not be easy 
and again the schedule is brutal." 

Coach Michalski is counting on returning players and co- 
captains Brett Wright, a junior point guard, and senior shoot- 
ing guard Jared Jones to provide crucial leadership for the 
young team, but he's looking for new team members to step 
forward as well. 

Another returning player who has caught his eye early is 
sophomore Chris Travis, a guard. "I'm really pleased with the 
way Chris has improved. We're trying to build a lot of things 
with him in mind." 

Because of the team's youth 
and the loss of its big players to 
graduation and other plans, Coach 
Michalski said the style of play will 
be different. "We'll press and run 
more. We should be very exciting 
for our fans," he said. 



IS SOCCER TEAM 
I ACES PLAYOFFS 



A young men's soccer team reached the conference 
playoffs and left Coach Sandy Zensen excited about the 
team's potential. 

"This was a good year, better than expected," Dr. 
Zensen said. "We finished sixth in the conference and 
made the playoffs, but with so many freshmen and 
sophomores starting and some key injuries, I'm satis- 
fied with the results. 

The 10-6 regular season record allowed the team to 
play in the conference tournament and "let our young 
players gain some experience playing under that kind 
of pressure." 

Coach Zensen singled out senior Isidro Loaiza for 
his leadership. "He continually challenged the team to 
excellence because it honors the Lord." 

He also commended Brian Eisenback for his com- 
mitment to excellence, and Josh Ray for leading the 
team with nine goals. 

Gray Douglas and Dan Harvey "no longer were 
playing as freshmen by the end of the season." 

And Russell Courtney "was an unsung hero. He 
anchored the defense and did as good a job as a sweep- 
er as I have seen in my 12 years here. I'm looking for 
him to continue in that capacity." 



UIT LIONS SOCCER Ml 

HUTS II IITIIHIS 

A 10-6-1 record, a top-10 national ranking and a trip 
to the NCCAA national tournament have Lady Lions 
soccer Coach Marc Neddo singing the praises of his 
team, as well as looking for more excitement next year. 

The Lady Lions spent three weeks at No. 1 in the 
NCCAA and finished the season in the top 10. Bryan 
won the Mid-East Regional title by forfeit and the trip 
to the nationals. 

The Lady Lions lost both games at the tournament, 
but Coach Neddo was pleased with the experience. 

The coach had particular praise for freshman for- 
ward Abby Snead, who scored 32 goals this season. She 
led the conference in scoring and was first in the 
NCCAA. 

He also praised senior Becky Kalz, a sweeper, who 
"was the leader of the team. She anchored the defense 
and was a major reason we had 10 shutouts." 

He also recognized Esther Bragg and Rachel Palmer 
for their contributions. Esther was second-leading scor- 
er and second in assists, and Rachel "was one of our 
most improved players." 



VOLLEY BALL TEAM 110 II REGION 

Bryan's volleyball team finished second in the NCCAA Mid-East Regional tournament 
before falling in the conference playoff. 

Coach Jerri Beck's charges compiled a 17-16, 10-6 record in the Appalachian Athletic 
Conference, and were ranked fourth. 

The Lady Lions' fourth-place conference finish was one better than a year ago, and with a 
young squad the coach is optimistic about next year's prospects. "We will lose (senior) Kelly 
Braun-Duin and will miss her leadership and court performance. But we're still a young 
team. It's been encouraging to see us come together." 



B AS EB ALL COACH 

AIDS 



y 



A former college baseball player who spent 14 years as a 
scout for four major league teams has his sights set high for 
Bryan's new baseball program. 

Preston Douglas, Bryan's new baseball coach, has a 
national championship as one of his goals. "I went to the 
College World Series as a player, and I want to go back as a 
coach," he said. "There's no experience like it." 

But winning on the field is only part of his dream. "I 
want all our players to graduate, to be better in every area 
of their lives when they graduate." 

Coach Douglas was attracted to Bryan because of the 
people, the quality of the facilities and the college's com- 
mitment to a first-rate baseball program. 

"I said if this is where I'm going to coach, this is where I 
want to retire. This is a place where I can serve the Lord," 
he said. 

Coach Douglas, a graduate of Pembroke State College, 
earned his Master's degree from Western Carolina 
University between stints as a high school and junior col- 
lege coach. He scouted for the Angels, White Sox, Brewers 
and Cubs before moving back into coaching at Montreat 
College. 

"I enjoy looking at young players and discovering tal- 
ent," he said. "Several 
of my recruits have 
gone on to play in the 
major leagues. But I 
also enjoy teaching, 
working with kids and 
encouraging them." 




IADY LIONS ■ AS K ET1 ALL 
SEES NEW BEGINNING 



It's a new beginning for the 2001-02 edition of the Lady 
Lions basketball team in more ways than one. 

New Coach Jim Arnold, three freshmen and one senior 
who transferred to Bryan this year, join the nine returning 
players seeking to improve on the team's nine-victory season 
from a year ago. Coach Arnold, a 1998 Bryan graduate, 
returned to Dayton this summer from Orlando, Fla., where he 
taught and coached high school boys and AAU girls team. 

The Lady Lions' roster includes three freshmen, six sopho- 
mores, two juniors and two seniors, "so we're an extremely 
young team," the coach said. "But I believe we will be very 
competitive in the conference." 

He said he is encouraged that the girls came to the opening 
practice in good physical condition and seems to be coming 
together as a team. 

Coach Arnold said he is particularly counting on senior 
transfer Becky Blesch, a small forward, this season. Becky, who 
came to Bryan from Liberty University, is the team captain this 
year. "At Liberty, her teams won the Big South Conference 
championship and went to 
the NCAA tournament. I'm 
counting on her for leader- 
ship, and she's really devel- 
oping in that area," he said. 



bers of the Lady 



Lions basketball team 
include, from left, 
front, Sarah Bass, 



LaRoy, Stephanie 
Huttenhoff, Jenny 

I— laotnn onrl I i-7 Rqoc 



Standing are Head 
Coach Jim Arnold, stu- 
dent assistant Brooke 
Wilson, Katie White, 
Valerie Huttenhoff, 
Kimmie Hill, Kate 
Strunk, Talor 
Armstrong, Becky 
Blesch, Brandi Harris, 
manager Rachel 
Schmitt and Asst. 
Coach Jerri Beck. 



FALL ATHLETIC HONORS 

For the Lady Lions soccer: Abby Snead, All- Appalachian Athletic Conference first 
team; Becky Kalz, second team. Rachael Palmer, Becky Kalz, Valerie Petitte, Jenny 
Hughes, Academic All-Conference team. 

Abby Snead, player of the year; Becky Kalz, Esther Bragg, Jenny Hughes, Rachael 
Palmer, Anna Hanger and Mya Morrison, NCCAA All-Region team. 

For the men's soccer: Coach Sandy Zensen, AAC Coach of the Year. Jamal Marshall 
and Josh Ray, All-Conference team. Isidro Loaiza, Brian Eisenback, Ben Carver, Phil 
Douglas, Jordan Mattheiss and Henry Barrios, All-Conference academic team. Isidro 
Loaiza and Ben Carver, NCCAA scholar athletes. Ben Carver, NAIA All- American schol- 
ar athlete. 

Volleyball: Brook Fleming, Randi Mellon and Kelly Braun-Duin, NCCAA Mid-East 
All-Region team. Brook Fleming and Laura Smith, All-Tournament team. Brook Fleming 
and Kelly Braun-Duin, NCCAA All- America Scholar- Athletes, NAIA National Scholar- 
Athletes. 

Brook Fleming, AAC All-Conference, All-Tournament. Randi Mellon, AAC Freshman 
of the Year. Brook Fleming, Kelly Braun-Duin, Laura Smith and Amalia Peters, AAC 
Scholar Athletes. 



Lady Lions Basketball Sc 


:hedu 


11/3 


Lee University 


Away 


11/6 


Midway 


A 


11/8 


Bluefield 


Home 


11/10 


Atlanta Christian 


A 


11/13 


Covenant 


A 


11/20 


Knoxville College 


H 


11/27 


Tennessee Temple 


H 


11/30 


Atlanta Christian 


H 


12/1 


Alice Lloyd 


A 


12/4 


Judson 


H 


12/6 


Midway 


H 


12/8 


Milligan 


A 


12/13 


Tennessee Temple 


A 


1/5 


Judson 


A 


1/8 


Virginia Intermont 


H 


1/11 


Bluefield 


A 


1/12 


Univ. of Virginia - Wise 


A 


1/15 


Brevard 


H 


1/17 


King 


H 


1/19 


Alice Lloyd 


H 


1/22 


Covenant 


H 


1/26 


Milligan 


H 


1/29 


Tennessee Wesleyan 


A 


2/1 


Brevard 


A 


2/2 


Montreat 


A 


2/5 


Tennessee Wesleyan 


H 


2/9 


Virginia Intermont 


A 


2/12 


King 


A 


2/15 


Montreat 


H 


2/16 


Univ. of Virginia - Wise 
Bold denotes home games 


H 



A lumni Matter 



Have you ever wondered where most Bryan College Alumni live? What they are 
doing? How many assist in funding scholarships for today's Bryan students? Or how 
many Alumni met their spouse at Bryan College? I have. 

While these ponderings didn't keep me awake at night or captivate me in "Johnny 
Appleseed-esque" suspense, they did provide for some interesting research and a nun 
ber of fascinating results. For those alumni who possess a keen "Trivial Pursuit" mind 
and an insatiable curiosity for factoids, the following information has been compiled: 



t 



State 
AL 
AK 
AR 
AZ 
CA 
CO 
CT 
DE 
DC 
FL 
GA 
HI 
ID 
IL 
IN 
IA 
KS 
KY 
LA 
ME 
MD 
MA 
Ml 
MN 
MS 
MO 
MT 
NE 
NV 
NH 
NJ 
NM 
NY 
NC 
ND 
OH 
OK 
OR 
PA 
Rl 
SC 
SD 
TN 
TX 
UT 
VT 
VA 
WA 
WV 
Wl 
WY 



Residents 
148 
28 
31 
71 
191 
124 
17 
23 
10 
756 
696 
1 

11 

205 
209 
52 
44 
179 
32 
23 
118 
30 
350 
71 
47 
95 
19 
31 
5 
11 

109 
10 
87 
445 

7 
299 
24 
33 
267 
3 

160 

6 

1842 

320 

2 

6 

374 

48 

78 

64 

10 



Vitril qinnq cincl 



other neat factoids 



Contactable A lumni: Of Bryan's 8,123 alumni, 6,161 
are contactable; we don't know addresses for 1,962. 

N eat marriage fact: 68% of contactable alumni are 
married to each other. 

Percentage of Bryan graduates who give to Bryan 
College and how they stack up to our peers according 
to US News & World Report: 

Liberty 1% 

Covenant 10% 

King 15% 

Bryan 23% 



Recent Alumni Statistics: 

-89% of Bryan graduates indicate that they 
are successful in achieving their first 
or second employment choice. 

-92% of Bryan graduates pursuing gradu- 
ate degrees indicate they were "well 
prepared" for advanced studies. 

Bryan Alumni Sector Profile: 

46% are in business and the professions 

29% are educators; 2/3 in public schools 

15% are in vocational ministry 

10% are homemakers 



Factoid: 

Class of 1980 holds 
the reunion atten- 
dance record with 
over 100 family mem- 
bers at their 20th 
anniversary. 



Alumni giving trends: 





Alumni News 



40's 



DURWARD (D.W.) MAY- 
NARD, '41x, was featured in 

The Louisville Courier Journal 
for his story of "Suit instead 
of soot." The article highlight- 
ed D.W/s journey as a coal 
miner's son pursuing a col- 
lege education. It took him 14 
years, working his way 
through six colleges in three 
states, earning a bachelor's 
degree in education, two 
degrees in law and a Ph.D. in 
survival skills. D.W. has been 
a member of the Kentucky 
Bar Association for almost 50 
years and still practices law 
six days a week. 

NELL PEARSON, '49, 
visited Bryan College during 
Homecoming 2001, when she 
was named an Alumna of the 
Year. She is a retired mission- 
ary and is planning to begin 
volunteer work at the 
Wycliffe Bible Translators 
office in Dallas, Texas. 



0': 



JACQUELINE (JONES) 
LEWIS, '50, and her hus- 
band, Cecil, celebrated their 
golden anniversary July 29. 
They have two daughters, 
five grandchildren and one 
great-grandson. They are 



enjoying retirement in Siloam 
Springs, Ark. 

LAMAR, '50, and 
DOROTHY (ALLEN), '52x, 
MODERT visited Bryan dur- 
ing Homecoming 2001 and 
Lamar and Dorothy were 
named Alumni of the Year. 
They both remain busy in 
their local church in 
Milwaukee, Wise. 

ERNEST, '52, and LOIS 
(CARTWRIGHT), '54x, LEE 
visited Bryan College in 
September. Ernest works 
with Wycliffe Bible 
Translators as a translation 
consultant in Dallas, Texas. 
His e-mail address is ernie- 
lee@sil.org. 

JAMES PITTS, '56x, and 
his wife, Barbara, are serving 
the Lord at Children's Haven 
of Morocco, a safe haven for 
orphans. The work at the 
orphanage at Ain Leuh hous- 
es six Moroccan babies, and 
they hope eventually to have 
100. Their e-mail address is 
chaven@IAM.net.ma. 

CHARLES WILLOUGH- 
BY, '56, and his wife, 
Charlotte, were to minister in 
Cuba in mid-November. 
Charles (Spud) was to hold 
two conferences for pastors 
and other Christian workers. 
Charlotte was to speak to 
ladies groups in area church- 
es and provide counseling. 

DAVID, '57, and KAY 
(TEMPLE), '55, HENRY have 
been working as missionaries 
in the Russian Far East for 
eight years. They have come 
a long way in learning 
Russian and Yakut language 
and culture. 



80 's 



60 's 



ROBERT, '62, and GRETA 
(SORRELL), '60, CARIGON 

recently celebrated their 40th 
wedding anniversary. Bob and 
Greta plan to move from 
Grandville, Mich., to work 
with the Hilo Missionary 
Church, where their son, Tim, 
is pastor. 



GERALD MATHISEN, 

'72, and his wife, Thelma, 
have moved to West 
Chicago, 111. Gerry serves 
with the academic partner- 
ships department of the 
Willow Creek Association in 
South Barrington, 111. Gerry 
and Thelma are rejoicing 
because of the college gradu- 
ations of both of their daugh- 
ters, Emily and Jamie. 

LEROY, '73, and BECKY 
(CONRAD), '72, NICHOL- 
SON and their son, Nathan, 
have returned from Pakistan 
due to the recent terrorist 
attacks. They plan to stay in 
Knoxville, Tenn., until it is 
safe to return to Pakistan. 

JANICE (RASH) TROS- 
TLE, '74, and her husband, 
Stephen, celebrated their 
25th wedding anniversary 
July 30. The Trostle family is 
home on furlough from Cape 
Town, South Africa, living in 
Maryland. 

THOMAS SMITH JR., 
'75, retired from the U.S. Air 
Force Reserve in June. At his 
retirement, he received an 
Air Force Retirement 
Certificate, Air Force 
Commendation Medal, a U.S. 
flag and an Air Force Reserve 
Squadron plaque. He lives in 
Greenville, S.C. 

STEPHEN STRAUSS, 
'76, has been promoted to 
director of SIM USA. Steve, 
Marcia and family have 
returned from Ethiopia and 
now live in Tega Cay, S.C. 

MICHAEL WOOD, '78, 
head coach for Chattanooga, 
Tenn/s, McCallie School var- 
sity cross country team, 
coached his team to the state 
championship in November. 
Mike and his wife, Paula, 
live in Chattanooga. 



JAMES, '81, and KAREN 
(CROWDER), '80, ASHLEY 

have resumed their work 
with Wycliffe in the Solomon 
Islands. Their children, 
Philip and Susan, are in high 
school, and Kent is in his 
third year at Bryan studying 
music administration. 

MARIE BRACKINRIDGE, 
'81, lives Wolfeboro, N.H., 
where she works as a chil- 
dren's therapist for a commu- 
nity mental health center. 






The Bell family on the cover of 

East Tennessee Reaching Out 

magazine 

LARRY BELL, '81, and 

his wife, Lora, were featured 
on the cover of the 
November issue of East 
Tennessee Reaching Out maga- 
zine. The article was written 
about their open hearts, open 
home and a biracial open 
adoption. Larry, Lora and 
their children, Bethany and 
Daniel, live in Knoxville, 
Tenn. 




Nathan and Sandy Bayley 
Cassie, Sarah, Frances and David 

SANDY (BENNETT) 
BAYLEY, '82, notified Bryan 
College of the death of her 
husband, Nathan, on Sept. 
20, after a 14-month battle 
with cancer. He was pastor 



of Cornerstone Chapel in 
Bristol, Term. They have 
three daughters, Cassie, 
Sarah and Frances, and a 
son, David. 

G. MICHAEL SMITH, 
'82, is now director of busi- 
ness development for Bryan, 
Pendleton, Swats & 
McAllister, LLC, in 
Brentwood, Tenn. 

RICHARD, '83x, and 
KIMBERLY (FIORI), '83, 
PARKER, and their two 
sons, Matthew and Greg, 
remain in South America, 
where they serve as mission- 
aries for Word of Life. This 
fall, they held their seventh 
graduation at the Bible insti- 
tute where they work. 

CHERYL (JOHNSON) 
RYLE, '84, her husband, 
Gregory, and family serve 
with Mission Aviation 
Fellowship in West Africa. 
Cheryl teaches one first- 
grade boy and five second- 
grade boys at Bamako 
Christian School. Matt, 
Jeremy and Ben attend the 
International Christian 
Academy this year. 

JERRY and CINDY 
(WILLIAMSON) WALKER, 
both '84, send greetings from 
Papua New Guinea. After 
two months of no rain, their 
3,000-gallon drinking water 
tank was very low and water 
started to taste bad. Jerry and 
the kids made a day of drain- 
ing and cleaning the tank. 
Now they are praying for 
rain. 

GARY, '85 and DEANNA 
(FLORE), '86, ELLISON, 
serve as missionaries to 
Mexico City. The Ellison fam- 
ily traveled more than 7,000 
miles in the United States 
before returning safely to 
Mexico. 




KATHY (BEATTY) BIM- 
BER, '86, and her husband, 
Jerry, announce the birth of 
their fourth child, Taylor 
Beth, on Sept. 6. Kathy and 
Jerry and their children, Jack, 
9; Lauren, 6; Brook, 4; and 
Taylor, live in Lombard, 111. 




Kathy and Jerry Bimber, Jack, 
Lauren, Brook and Taylor 



Vicky, and Michael Dye and 
Fiona Grace 

VICKY (MOHLER) DYE, 

'86, and her husband, 
Michael, announce the birth 
of Fiona Grace, on Aug. 24. 
Fiona and her parents live in 
Collinsville, 111. 

DEBBIE (BARWICK) 
KIPPS, '87, and her husband, 
John, announce the birth of 
Samuel Tyler, on Aug. 15. Big 
brothers Nathan and Andy 
are excited to have a new 
brother. Debbie and her fami- 
ly live in Vienna, Va. Debbie 
recently had lunch with 
ANNA (CULPEPPER) 
WISHARD, '86, at the home 
of KELLY (KIK) 
MCCLELLAND, '88x. They 
had a great time reminiscing 
of their years at Bryan while 
their nine children played 
together. 

ELIZABETH (BRAN- 
SON) WOOD, '87, and her 
husband, Timothy, are mis- 
sionaries to Beira, 
Mozambique. They are con- 
tinuing with Cindau lessons 
and their involvement with 
the church is more intense 
than ever. 

TERRY, '88x, and Sherry 
COPELAND and their two 
girls, Xan and Taylor, live in 
Knoxville, Tenn., where Terry 
is director of collections at 
EdSouth, a student loan com- 
pany. 

CELESTA (BEACHY) 
RICHARSON, '88, and her 
husband, Dennis, serve as 



missionaries in Anchorage, 
Alaska. Their focus in the fall 
is the Fall Gathering, a time 
for ministering to the native 
men and women around 
Anchorage. You can check 
out their website at 
www.nativemenforchrist.org. 

JAMES WOYCHUCK, 
'89, and SUSAN KLAUS, 
'88, were married Aug. 4. 
Many Bryan friends attended 
their wedding and are pic- 
tured, from left, front, 
CHARLIE GOODMAN, '81; 
SHARON (WOYCHUCK) 
GOODMAN, '81; NANCY 
SPOEDE, '85H; ELIZABETH 
(CARDEN) KELLEY, '89x; 
JOHN KELLEY, '89; TIM 
COMBS, '90; and BRYAN 
REGIER, '93. Second row, 
MELODEE (WOLCOTT) 
ALLEN, '90; MARK JOR- 
DAN, '89x; DR. ROBERT 
SPOEDE, '85H;, TARA 
(BUCKLEN) CRUZ, '89. 
Third row, EDWARD FICK- 
LEY, '89; NOEL ALLEN, '89; 
DANIEL BUTLER, '87; 
DAVID SPOEDE, '78; 
JONATHAN KLAUS, '86; 
SUSAN WOYCHUCK, '88; 
JAMES WOYCHUCK, '89; 
BRUCE BEATY, '85; BOB- 
BIE BROOKS, '90; DANNY 
CAMPBELL, '89; and RAUL 
CRUZ, '88. 



Xtigte 



^VflkMii 



The Smith and Roes children 

CHRISTINE (PIERCE) 
SMITH, '90x, and her family 
visited with BECKY (NAFF), 
'90x, and BRETT, '88, ROES 
during a vacation in Orlando, 
Fla., this summer. 
Pictured, from left, are 
Christian Roes, Michael 
Smith, Stephen Smith, Sarah 
Roes, Jonathan Smith, Carson 
Roes, Caleb Smith, B.J. Roes 
and Mary Roes. 

DAVID, '90, and SYLVIA 
(SUGANANDAM), '89, 
BANKS attended 
Homecoming 2001 where 
they visited with classmates 
DAMON, '90, and LEA 
(JOHNSON), '89, KELLY 
and family. 




Lea and Damon Kelly, David and 
Sylvia Banks 




James and Susan Woychuck and friends 



90 's 



TIMOTHY COMBS, '90, 

and his wife, Becky, announce 
the arrival of their second 
son, Jacob Christopher, on 
Oct. 19. They live in Xenia, 
Ohio, where Tim is assistant 
principal for Xenia Christian 
High School. 



JENNIFER (REYNOLDS) 
KINSEY, '91, attended her 10- 
year class reunion during 
Homecoming 2001. Jennifer 
and her husband, Vernon, 
live in Seminole, Fla. 
Pictured are members of the 
Class of 1991, from left, front, 
DEBBIE (MACNAB) 
GEGERSON, RONA HAL- 
COMB, CHRISSY (CAMP- 
BELL) BARKMAN, JEN- 
NIFER (REYNOLDS) KIN- 



10 



SEY, PAM WHITE and 
CHRISTINE (MASSEY) 
DAVIS. Back are DAN WIL- 
SON, ED ELMORE, GREG 
BARKMAN, KEVIN BOOT, 
DR. BOB DAILY, ERIC 
ENGER, JENNIFER (GAR- 
MON) SANDERS and 
SUSAN (EFIRD) BRACKEN. 



* ^ i 'IBM 



Eric and Stephanie Enger, Nathan 
and Erika Snyder 




Jennifer Kinsey and members of the Class of 1991 



KEVIN and KARLA 
(TRAMMELL) BOOT, both 
'91, attended Homecoming 
2001. They live in 
Sharpsburg, Ga. 




Kevin and Karla Boot 

GREG and CHRISTINA 
(CAMPBELL) BARKMAN, 

both '91, attended 
Homecoming 2001. Greg, 
Chrissy and their two sons, 
Samuel and Zachary, live in 
Fayetteville, N.C. 



JUNE (CRABTREE) 
DIXON, '91, graduated in 
May with a Master of Social 
Work degree from the 
University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill. June and her 
husband, Greg, live in 
Lynchburg, Va., where June 
works as a family therapist. 

ROBERT, '91, and KARIS 
(WHITE), '90, KOEHN, and 
their sons, Daniel and 
Joseph, serve as missionaries 
with the Africa Inland 
Mission in Mutari, 
Zimbabwe. 

ERIC ALBRIGHT, '94, 
and his wife, Allison, send 
greetings from Southeast 
Asia. They have been busy in 
field training, learning about 
rural and urban living in 
Asia. 




Greg and Chrissy Barkman, 
Samuel and Zachary 

NATHAN, '91, and ERIKA 
(LORENZEN), '92, SNYDER 
visited with ERIC ENGER, '91, 

and his wife, Stephanie, dur- 
ing Homecoming 2001. 



Chris and Chanin Gilman, Daniel, 
Brenda, Joseph and Kendall 

CHRISTOPHER, '94, and 
CHANIN (ASHWORTH), 
'93, GILMAN announce the 
birth of their fourth child, 



Joseph Andrew, on Sept. 2. 
He joins Kendall, 6; Daniel, 4; 
and Brenna, 2. They reside in 
Richmond, Va., where Chris 
is a CPA and Chanin is a 
homemaker. 



<>wwnimmmimmm 

■If *- 




Hanna West 

PATRICK, '95x, and 
MELANIE (GIESE), '94x, 
WEST, announce the birth of 
Hannah Madelyn on Aug. 30. 

KRISTY COPENHAVER, 
'97, and Andy Stewart were 
married June 30. Andy and 
Kris reside in Bucyrus, Ohio. 

STEPHEN and JEN- 
NIFER (BLANTON) 
MAYES, both '97x, announce 
the arrival of Kaelle, on May 
24. She joins Kelly, 6; Kody, 
4; and Kristopher, 2. The 
Mayes family lives in Fort 
Polk, La. 




Auburn Taylor 

JIM and JULIA 
(BRUEHL) TAYLOR, both 
'98, welcome their first son, 
Auburn, born June 20. The 
Taylor family lives in 
Mesquite, TX. 

KATHLEEN HICKS, '98, 
traveled to Beijing and Tibet 
this past summer on a sur- 
vey trip. She and her team- 
mates found many opportu- 
nities for professionals who 
want to share Christ. 
Kathleen lives in 
Chattanooga, Term., where 
she teaches English and 
drama at Grace Baptist 
Academy. 



DAVID LEE, 98x, is 

deployed in Kosovo as a 
chaplain assistant in the U.S. 
Army. 

GREGORY and ASHLEY 
(MCCDONALD) SOVER- 
EIGN, both '99, announce the 
arrival of Caedmon, on June 
20. The Sovereigns live in 
Morrisville, N.C. 

With the Lord 



M. SUE GREEN, '60x, 

died Aug. 12. 

DR. RONALD TAYLOR, 

'74, died Oct. 1. Dr. Taylor 
was president of the 
Pinecrest Bible Training 
Center in New York. His 
wife, Helen, survives him. 

ANTHONY MCBRIDE, 
'79, died Nov. 6, after a long 
illness. He is survived by his 
wife, Lynn, and daughters 
Chelsea and Courtney. 

Reunions 



May 3 & 4, 2002 

Class of 1952 (50 years) 
July 26 & 27, 2002 
Class of 1977 (25 years) 
October '02 

Classes of 1937, 1942, 1947, 
1957, 1962, 1967, 1972, 1982, 
1987, 1992, 1997 
and cluster reunion in honor 
of 2002 (includes 1999, 2000, 
2001, 2003, 2004, 2005) 



Alumni News 



li 



U 



Bryan celebrates 
,fll ! Things New' ho 



speaKS aunng ine nomecoming oeo 
ication service on the Triangle 
Commons. Rep. Hilleary, who lives i 
* V Spring City north of Dayton, is a can 

te for Governor of Tennessee. 



Winnie Buck, a senior liberal arts major 
from Chattanooga, Tenn., daughter of 
Jeff and Linda Buck and Suzanne Buck, 
and Adam Parker, a senior business 
major from Covington, Ga., son of Ruel 
and Linda Parker, were crowned home- 
coming queen and king during cere- 
monies before the soccer game. Winnie 
was crowned by last year's queen, 
Christina Senter. Winnie plans to attend 
graduate school, and Adam plans to go 
into banking after graduation. 



Bryan President Dr. William 
E. Brown, center, greets 
U.S. Rep. Zach Wamp, R- 
3th District, before the start 
of the Homecoming dedica- 
tion service on the Triangle 
Commons Oct. 6. At right is 
Trustee Dan Dorrill. 




Dr. Brown introduces Erwin D. "Lat" Latimer, 
center, and Lane Latimer after announcing the 
Student Life Center has been named the 
Latimer Student Center in their honor. Mr. 
Latimer is a trustee of the college. The Latimers' 
children gave the sign in front of the student 
center in honor of their parents. 




Nell Pearson, a 1 947 graduate of Bryan 
College, was named one of three Alumni 
of the Year during homecoming cere- 
monies in October. Miss Pearson, of 
Edinburg, Texas, served as a missionary 
for more than 40 years in Russia and 
South Africa and now works in the 
library of Rio Grande Bible College. She 
is pictured, with, from left, Alumni 
Association President Steve Stewart, 
Director of Alumni Ministries Brett Roes 
and President Dr. Bill Brown. 




Lamar and Dorothy (Allen) Modert of 
Milwaukee, Wise, were named Alumni 
of the Year during homecoming in 
October. Mr. Modert, a 1950 graduate, 
and Mrs. Modert, a member of the Class 
of 1952, were recognized for their 
Christian service and support of the col- 
lege. Mr. Modert is a registered profes- 
sional engineer and a certified manufac- 
turing engineer. Mrs. Modert worked in 
public schools for many years. 



Bob and Nan Simpson were named honorary 
Bryan alumni during homecoming in October, rec- 
ognizing their years of service to and support of 
the college. Dr. Simpson is professor of mathemat- 
ics at Bryan, Mrs. Simpson teaches math part-time 
for Chattanooga State Technical Community 
College and operates a business in Dayton. 
Pictured with the Simpsons are, from left, Alumni 
Association President Steve Stewart, Director of 
Alumni Ministries Brett Roes and President Dr. 
William E. Brown. 



Homecoming celebrated Bryan's "All Things New" 
theme as the college family dedicated the new library, 
Administration Building and Triangle Commons and gave a 
new name to the Student Life Center. 

Dr. Gary Phillips, distinguished professor of Bible and 
philosophy, spoke during the Thursday night sacred assem- 
bly, which focused on a dedication of the Triangle 
Commons. At the conclusion of the service, students and 
others formed a circle between the Administration Building 
and student center and lit candles as Dr. Phillips led in 
prayer. 

Dr. Phillips, who resigned at the end of the 2000-2001 
school year to become a full-time pastor, said, "In our coun- 
try, and here at Bryan College, we have learned the hard les- 
sons that buildings are really buildings; it's the people who 
are eternal. I think Bryan College has never been stronger, 
because it's not a matter of buildings, it's a matter of vision 
before God, of Who He is and who we are in light of that." 

Saturday's dedication service featured remarks by two 
members of Tennessee's congressional delegation, Fourth 
District Rep. Van Hilleary and Third District Rep. Zach 
Wamp. Rep. Hilleary congratulated the college on being "an 
example of what can be achieved when generosity and 
resolve turn into action." Rep. Wamp commented on the ter- 
rorist attacks against this country, pointing out that positive 
results of the attacks have been a renewal of national unity 
and interest in spiritual, particularly Christian, values. 

Bryan President Dr. William E. Brown announced that 
the college trustees voted to name the student center in 
honor of Erwin D. "Lat" and Lane Latimer. Mr. Latimer has 
served on the board since 1992, and co-chaired the fund-rais- 
ing campaign that resulted in construction of the building. 

In addition, Vice President for Business Dee Mooney 
announced that the new clock on the Triangle has been 
named for the late Billie Barrows, a former trustee and 
mother of present trustee Betty Ruth Seera. 

Following the program on the Triangle, Dr. Brown host- 
ed a luncheon for trustees and other guests on the second 
floor of the library. At the same time, Library Director Laura 
Kaufmann and her staff were hosts for another luncheon for 
librarians from other college and public libraries in the area. 
Among those attending were former Bryan librarians Ginny 
Seguine Schatz and David Wright. 

During Saturday evening's Celebration 2001 program, 
Dr. Brown outlined the second phase of The New Century 
Campaign, a $25 million effort to endow faculty salaries, 
program costs of the Worldview Studies Institute, scholar- 
ship needs and campus improvements including a new 
gymnasium, residence hall, expansion of Rudd Auditorium 
and construction of a new entrance to the college. 

Celebration 2001 concluded with a 20-minute fireworks 
show, with spectators spread out on the Grassy Bowl as well 
as in Point Park at the foot of Bryan Hill. 

Homecoming 2001 concluded with an alumni worship 
service Sunday morning, featuring a performance by the 
alumni choir under the direction of Dr. David Luther, and a 
message from Dr. Brown, fill 



LAUNCHING INTO THE NEW CENTU 



Bryan College's most successful 
building program ever, 
the Student Life Center, is now a 
prominent landmark on the campus. 



Now, in the most ambitious undertaking since Bryan College 
was organized, the Trustees and Administration invite you to 
be a part of Phase II of The New Century Campaign. The New 
Century Campaign will provide the resources necessary to 




attract students wno snare our goal or making a difference in 
their world through a quality, Christ- centered education. 



Bryan College Capital Needs: 



$5-5 million 



Totals 



$2.7 millic 



$700,000 



Already, gifts totaling nearly $5 million have been given or 
fledged to the New Century Campaign. We urge you to prayer- 
ully consider your participation as Bryan College takes a bold 
lew step in faith. 



about how you can help Bryan Collet 



cate students to become servants 



rerence in today s world. 



o make a 




m 



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Dayton, TN 373217000 
423-775-2041 




Can You Think of 



Someone Who 






Needs to Know 
More About 
Bryan College? 





















Have Them Call . . . 

1.800.277.9522 

OR APPLY ONLINE TODAY 
AT 

www.bryan.edu 
















Bryan College • Office of Admissions • P.O. Box 7000 • Dayton, TN 37321 • admiss@bryan.edu 












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